ferngirl

poetry, gender, cats, and such

99 notes

socimages:

Banal nationalism: the relationship between the 4th of July and the profound sense of national pride that inspires people to enlist into war.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
In his book by the same name, Michael Billig coined the term “banal nationalism” to draw attention to the ways in which nationalism was not only a quality of gun-toting, flag-waving “extremists,” but was quietly and rather invisibly reproduced by all of us in our daily lives.
That we live in a world of nations was not inevitable; that the United States, or Sweden or India, exist was not inevitable.  I was born in Southern California.  If I had been born at another time in history I would have been Mexican or Spanish or something else altogether.  The nation is a social construction.
The nation, then, must be reproduced. We must be reminded, constantly, that we are part of this thing called a “nation.”  Even more, that we belong to it and it belongs to us.  Banal nationalism is how the idea of the nation and our membership in it is reproduced daily.  It occurs not only with celebrations, parades, or patriotic war, but in “mundane,” “routine,” and “unnoticed” ways.
The American flag, for example, casually hanging around in yards and in front of buildings everywhere and references to the nation on our money:

The way that the news is usually split into us and everyone else:

The naming of clubs and franchises, such as the National Football League, as specific to our country:

The performance of the pledge of allegiance in schools and sports arenas:

So, what?  What could possibly be the problem?
Sociologists have critiqued nationalism for being the source of an irrational commitment and loyalty to one’s nation, a commitment that makes one willing to both die and kill.  Billig argues that, while it appears harmless on the surface, “banal nationalism can be mobilized and turned into frenzied nationalism.”  The profound sense of national pride required for war, for example, depends on this sense of nationhood internalized over a lifetime.  So banal nationalism isn’t “nationalism-lite,” it’s the very foundation upon which more dangerous nationalisms are built.
You can download a more polished two-page version of this argument, forthcoming in Contexts magazine, here.  Images found here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

Banal nationalism: the relationship between the 4th of July and the profound sense of national pride that inspires people to enlist into war.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

In his book by the same name, Michael Billig coined the term “banal nationalism” to draw attention to the ways in which nationalism was not only a quality of gun-toting, flag-waving “extremists,” but was quietly and rather invisibly reproduced by all of us in our daily lives.

That we live in a world of nations was not inevitable; that the United States, or Sweden or India, exist was not inevitable.  I was born in Southern California.  If I had been born at another time in history I would have been Mexican or Spanish or something else altogether.  The nation is a social construction.

The nation, then, must be reproduced. We must be reminded, constantly, that we are part of this thing called a “nation.”  Even more, that we belong to it and it belongs to us.  Banal nationalism is how the idea of the nation and our membership in it is reproduced daily.  It occurs not only with celebrations, parades, or patriotic war, but in “mundane,” “routine,” and “unnoticed” ways.

The American flag, for example, casually hanging around in yards and in front of buildings everywhere and references to the nation on our money:

800px-united_states_one_dollar_bill_obverse

The way that the news is usually split into us and everyone else:

usnews

The naming of clubs and franchises, such as the National Football League, as specific to our country:

300_174281

The performance of the pledge of allegiance in schools and sports arenas:

Pledge of Allegiance

So, what?  What could possibly be the problem?

Sociologists have critiqued nationalism for being the source of an irrational commitment and loyalty to one’s nation, a commitment that makes one willing to both die and kill.  Billig argues that, while it appears harmless on the surface, “banal nationalism can be mobilized and turned into frenzied nationalism.”  The profound sense of national pride required for war, for example, depends on this sense of nationhood internalized over a lifetime.  So banal nationalism isn’t “nationalism-lite,” it’s the very foundation upon which more dangerous nationalisms are built.

You can download a more polished two-page version of this argument, forthcoming in Contexts magazine, here.  Images found herehereherehereherehere, and here.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

Filed under nationalism usa 'murica nation sociology ideas

143 notes

thequeenmothershat asked: Do you guys have any suggestions for mst3k quotes for a tattoo?

fuckyeahmst3k:

"I’m Huge!"

"Push the button, Frank"

"Nobody gets me. I’m the wind, baby."

"We’ve got movie sign"

"I should really just relax"

Reblog with your own suggestions!

ROBOT ROLL CALL!

Filed under mst3k tattoo ideas

777 notes

hipsterfood:

Lately all I’ve been eating are smoothies, salads, and sandwiches. Something about summer makes me want to keep things dead simple and no-bake. (Maybe it’s the no air conditioning and greenhouse-like kitchen? I insisted on big windows, I only have myself to blame.)
This is one of my go-to sandwiches because it comes together in a snap. Don’t be tempted to compare this to its meat-based counterpart, they’re not the same but they have similar profiles: smoky crispy protein with crunchy greens, soft flavorful tomatoes, and creamy cool avocado. It’s a perfect combination that takes barely any effort, a win-win in my sunny kitchen!
Read more…

hipsterfood:

Lately all I’ve been eating are smoothies, salads, and sandwiches. Something about summer makes me want to keep things dead simple and no-bake. (Maybe it’s the no air conditioning and greenhouse-like kitchen? I insisted on big windows, I only have myself to blame.)

This is one of my go-to sandwiches because it comes together in a snap. Don’t be tempted to compare this to its meat-based counterpart, they’re not the same but they have similar profiles: smoky crispy protein with crunchy greens, soft flavorful tomatoes, and creamy cool avocado. It’s a perfect combination that takes barely any effort, a win-win in my sunny kitchen!

Read more…

0 notes

For Me, Birth Control is Medicine First, Contraceptive Second

from the article:

On the SCOTUS live blog, here’s how it was phrased: “This decision concerns only the contraceptive mandate and should not be understood to mean that all insurance mandates, that is for blood transfusions or vaccinations, necessarily fail if they conflict with an employer’s religious beliefs.” 

In other words, this decision was intended to have no bearing on other, more “legitimate” medical needs. Things like transfusions and shots are safe, because it’s generally accepted that these are good medicine, and you’d be crazy to deny someone access to them. But contraceptives are a squishier subject. Because they are closely aligned with sex, they’re tainted.

Filed under women's rights reproductive rights women's health hobby lobby misogyny women are not 2nd class citizens